Veterinary Care and Breeding


Are you Prepared?

 

One must be fully prepared before breeding. Ask yourself:

Do you have have the money for this? Breeding involves many veterinarian bills. The pregnancy may have complications. A cesarean section may need to be performed. You will need extra food, possibly milk supplement and more.

Do you have the time? Those newborn puppies need to have a careful eye on them around the clock. Hypoglycemia is just one of the many health issues that can suddenly strike a newborn puppy.

Do you have the emotional strength? Even the best breeders in the world experience loss. Even with years of experience, there may be a puppy or puppies that do not make it. If all goes well, how will you feel when the puppies go to their new homes?

Thinking of Breeding Your Pomeranian?

Think about this carefully before you decide to breed your Pomeranian. This is not to be taken lightly and research should be done before undergoing a task requiring so much responsibility. There is so much involved to make sure that breeding Pomeranians produce healthy puppies! If you are confident that you can handle the responsibility of breeding your Pom, do keep in mind that this is one of the smallest toy breeds that exist and ethical breeding will involve placing the needs and well-being of the dam, sire and future puppies above all else. You will be spending money and dedicating a lot of time to your commitment, whether you decide to have just one litter or if you wish to start a small breeding program.

 Important Elements

All Pom owners should think very carefully before breeding their dog. Some people wish to breed “Designer Dogs”. These dogs of mixed breeds are given cute names and sound appealing…however technically to do so is to weaken the strength of the Pomeranian bloodline. This is most likely a trend and trends can disappear quickly.If you wish to breed your Pomeranian, we would hope that you are planning to breed a purebred to purebred. One of the mottoes of established, reputable breeders is to do so for the betterment of the breed. We suggest that this be taken very seriously.You will want to pair dogs to produce Poms that are excellent representations of the Pomeranian breed while working hard to eliminate genetic health issues. When this goal is met, another litter of Poms will be born that have a strong bloodline and will be part of the development of the Pom that keeps it strong and compliant to the standards.

Health Checks

To avoid passing on genetic health issues to puppies, both dam and sire must be tested to rule out certain eye disease, hearing issues and hip issues. The main tests will include:

• CERF -to check for heritable eye diseases)

• BAER – to check for hearing issues

• OFA – to check for genetic orthopedic issues including hip and elbow dysplasia 

 

Thinking of Breeding Your Pomeranian? Think about this carefully before you decide to breed your Pomeranian. This is not to be taken lightly and research should be done before undergoing a task requiring so much responsibility. There is so much involved to make sure that breeding Pomeranians produce healthy puppies! If you are confident that you can handle the responsibility of breeding your Pom, do keep in mind that this is one of the smallest toy breeds that exist and ethical breeding will involve placing the needs and well-being of the dam, sire and future puppies above all else. You will be spending money and dedicating a lot of time to your commitment, whether you decide to have just one litter or if you wish to start a small breeding program.

 

Things to remember when breeding Poms

Weight: With toy breed dogs, it is always best if the female is larger than the male; with both still falling within the acceptable standard weight. A good example would be a 7 lb. female paired with a 4 lb. male. Please note: Taking two very small “runt” Pomeranians and breeding them together to produce unnaturally tiny puppies – to be marketed as Teacups – is extremely unethical and will only produce very unhealthy puppies. Any puppies born from that type of breeding will have huge risks of major health problems. Age: How old should your Pomeranian be when you breed him or her? We suggest that a female should be at least 2 years old and have gone through a heat cycle. Pomeranian females should be retired from breeding when she is 7 years old maximum. She can continue to enter heat until she is 12 years old (and sometimes for her entire life). As soon as you know that you will not breed your Pomeranian anymore, you should have her spayed. This is very important to her health. Though males begin to produce sperm approximately at the young age of 4 months old, the lilponderosa does not accept litters sired by males under the age of 7. We suggest waiting until a male Pomeranian is at least 1 year old to use him in a breeding program. Health: It should go without saying that you should make sure your Pomeranian is healthy before attempting to breed her. She should have a complete check up at the veterinarian and get the “okay” to conceive. Both your Pomeranian and the chosen sire must have medical checkups to check for hereditary diseases which could be passed on to pups. Aside from the standard genetic testing, her pelvis should be evaluated for proper girth. In addition, consider any other issues that while they will not be passed on to a litter, would cause additional stress to be put on the dog.

How often? How often can you allow your female Pomeranian to breed? Each Pomeranian must be evaluated to ensure that they are ready for a litter. The recommended guidelines are as follows: It is recommended to wait until your female Pomeranian is at least 2 years old to have a litter. You may breed 2 heat cycles in a row and then allow a rest or breed every other heat cycle. Remember, these are guidelines only…your female Pomeranian should be evaluated by your experienced veterinarian to make sure that she is able to safely handle this schedule. For example, if your Pomeranian had to have a cesarean, extra rest in between liters is vital. Mother nature is in charge when all is said and done. However it is vital that the female Pomeranian be given plenty of rest. The dam should be retired from breeding between the age of 5 and 7. Your vet may decide that your Pomeranian should retire earlier. Again, medical testing and evaluation must be done for your dog on a regular bases to make sure that she is receiving plenty of rest in between litters and that her body is fully recovering between litters.

How do I know if my Pomeranian is adequately hydrated?
A cool little trick that I use to determine if my Poms are getting enough water is to lift up their skin on the back of their neck . Please don’t pull a fist full of skin up… gently pull their skin up and see what happens. When your Pomeranian is adequately hydrated, the skin will fall fast and back into place very quickly… if they are not, it will fall slow and create kind of a tent on their neck. If you don’t like pulling on your furry babies skin… then it is a good idea to check their gums. If their gums are moist and have a slick sense about them, then they are hydrated. If you see that they are dry or sticky then your Pom definitely needs water. I know it sounds a little crazy but there is a condition called “psychogenic polydipsia” that happens when your Pomeranians want to drink more water than they need. Most people and Vet Parkville call it “water intoxication” and can take on some weird behavior such as; staggering, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, bloating, lethargy, glazed over eyes, pupils that are dilated, light pigmented gums and most common is excessive salivation. Very rarely but can still happen is difficulty breathing, seizures, coma and with any overdose, death. Courtesy of Dog Walking Towson.